Gucken Franz�Sisch


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Gucken Franz�Sisch

Übersetzung für 'gucken' im kostenlosen Deutsch-Französisch Wörterbuch und viele weitere Französisch-Übersetzungen. gucken. [ˈgʊkən]transitives Verb | verbe transitif v/t umgangssprachlich | familier umg. Übersicht aller Übersetzungen. (Für mehr Details die Übersetzung. ts-rc.eu | Übersetzungen für 'gucken' im Französisch-Deutsch-Wörterbuch, mit echten Sprachaufnahmen, Illustrationen, Beugungsformen.

Gucken Franz�Sisch Übersetzungen und Beispiele

Übersetzung Deutsch-Französisch für gucken im PONS Online-Wörterbuch nachschlagen! Gratis Vokabeltrainer, Verbtabellen, Aussprachefunktion. Übersetzung Deutsch-Französisch für guckt im PONS Online-Wörterbuch nachschlagen! Gratis Vokabeltrainer, Verbtabellen, Aussprachefunktion. Übersetzung im Kontext von „gucken“ in Deutsch-Französisch von Reverso Context: mal gucken, wir gucken. Lernen Sie die Übersetzung für 'gucken' in LEOs Französisch ⇔ Deutsch Wörterbuch. Mit Flexionstabellen der verschiedenen Fälle und Zeiten ✓ Aussprache. Übersetzung für 'gucken' im kostenlosen Deutsch-Französisch Wörterbuch und viele weitere Französisch-Übersetzungen. Viele übersetzte Beispielsätze mit "gucken" – Französisch-Deutsch Wörterbuch und Suchmaschine für Millionen von Französisch-Übersetzungen. Viele übersetzte Beispielsätze mit "Filme gucken" – Französisch-Deutsch Wörterbuch und Suchmaschine für Millionen von Französisch-Übersetzungen.

Gucken Franz�Sisch

Übersetzung für 'gucken' im kostenlosen Deutsch-Französisch Wörterbuch und viele weitere Französisch-Übersetzungen. Viele übersetzte Beispielsätze mit "Filme gucken" – Französisch-Deutsch Wörterbuch und Suchmaschine für Millionen von Französisch-Übersetzungen. gucken. [ˈgʊkən]transitives Verb | verbe transitif v/t umgangssprachlich | familier umg. Übersicht aller Übersetzungen. (Für mehr Details die Übersetzung.

Gucken Franz�Sisch - "gucken" auf Französisch

Latein Wörterbücher. Ungarisch Wörterbücher. Wie kann ich Übersetzungen in den Vokabeltrainer übernehmen? Vorschläge: Gucke. Neuen Eintrag schreiben. Arabisch Wörterbücher. German Sie können natürlich Filme gucken. We are using the following form field to detect spammers. Genau: Senden Sie uns gern einen neuen Dschungelcamp 2019 Beginn.

Like 6, it is a pure vowel sound, and not a diph- thong. It resembles the sound of the English u in "busy. Pronnnciation of the gnttoral g d.

It is softer and made farther forward in the mouth after c and i, than after o, o, and u. For the first variety of the guttural approximate the middle of the tongue to but not touching the roof of the mouth, and then expel the breath, being careful to keep the tip of the tongue down, and not to make the English sh sound.

For the second variety of the guttural, approxi- mate the back of the tongue to but not touching the back part of the mouth, being careful not to make the English k sound.

S ogQr. Initial f has a 2 sound ; final S has the sound of the English sharp s. Short c, however, in an unaccented final syllable, is a vanishing sound, and has a lighter shade than else- where, corresponding nearly to the sound in the English " but.

The following general rules determine the quantity in a great number of cases : — I A Toivel doubled or followed by b is long.

A Towel is also long in an open syllable, i. Vowels and consonants are doubled for the pur- pose of indicating quantity, and are not to be pronounced double.

The vowel i is never doubled, but the sign tc is used instead, which accordingly has the sound of the English e, 1 6.

So far as the quantity is not determined by these rules, it must be ascertained from the dic- tionary. It is not desirable, however, to direct the attention of the beginner to the subject of quantity at first.

It is best learned by practice and obser- vation. The following table indicates the remaining sounds : — Vowels. The Umlaut d has been indicated in the table as having the same sound as e.

Examples: Sfirc, 3agcr. Also jtiil'c. The German v, however, has a differ- ent formation from, and is more strongly uttered than the English r.

It should be rolled, either with the tip of the tongue, or gutturally. The f initial is softer than the English s. Example: Sol n. Examples : ftngen, lange, 8ingen.

The pronunciation like Eng. Examples: tatl, teln. Examples: i. Accent, — The accent in original German words is in general the same as in English, i.

Foreign Words, — These vary greatly in their pro- nunciation, according as they have become more or less fully naturalized, being sometimes pronounced as in the foreign tongue, sometimes after the analogy of the German, and sometimes partly in one way and partly in the other.

Many nouns from the Latin have the accent on the last syllable. A standard Fremdworterbuch is the best guide. Division into Syllables, — The syllabification of German words follows the English rather than the American usage.

A consonant between two vowels generally goes with the latter vowel, except In compounds. Of several medial consonants, the last goes with the second syllable.

In learning to pronounce German as any new lan- guage , the attention of the beginner should be called to a distinct and forcible utterance.

Practice in reading aloud and committing to memory are fruitful aids in accom- plishing the desired object of training the organs of speech.

Exercise i. Iat m. S diiemavf. UbcL fiber, fur. U oIIcn. I dttc. J Exercise i. I ein. S onau. II Exercise i. St cmic. S orotI c'a. Reading i. End good all good.

What thoumakest, that make not badly. What thou learnest, learn well, What thou doest, do not badly. The declension of the article is specially im- portant, as serving to form an introduction to German declension in general.

The nominative, genitive, and accusative correspond in general to the English subjective, possessive or "of" case , and objective, respectively. In German, as in French, nouns without sex may be masculine or feminine.

The following facts of declension in general are to be noted : — 1. The dative plural always ends in n. In the feminine and neuter, both singular and plural, the nominative and accusative are the same.

We, the. Exercise 2. S er SBater ift ott. S ic 2od ter ift jung. The father and the mother. The son and the daughter. The man and the child. The house of the son.

The wife of Jhe man. The man is old. The house is white, 8. The child is good. The dog is small. The garden is fine.

The daughter is young. Is the horse white.? Is the bread old.? Is the child small? Is the house old? We are young. I am tall. Thou art young.

UvSfid, nothing. Note i. SBer jprid tgran36fifd? Reading 2. Hasten with delay. Wilt thou always farther roam? For happiness is always there.

Wilt thou constantly farther roam? See, the good lies so near, Learn only happiness to seize, For happiness is always present.

Declension of biefct this. Mcfcr, biefc, biefei9, this. Hefer, of these, Dat. It will be convenient to call these ,,bct" words.

See p. So hereafter. Exercise 3. Sebcr aj? This daughter. Of that man. This man's son. Every book. That house is new. This book is handsome. This paper is red.

That hat is white. Many a man is tall. The garden of that man. The daughter's friend. This flower is beautiful The hat i.

This paper is blue. We have some ' paper. Note 5. Etc, etc I. Etc, etc Reading 3. Now exults she also loudly. Indefinite Article eitt.

Norn, etit, eitte, ettt, a. WO, where. Remark i. The article indicates the case. Exercise 4. SBir Ijatten eiit 2Reffer.

A father and a son. A mother and a daughter. A flower of the garden. Is the merchant your' friend. This is my book. Was he young. I am old.

My hat is here. I had some paper, n. Has she a sister. She has a flower. A sis- ter of the merchant. Where is his hat. Where was he. Is she well? Etc, etc.

Reading 4. Practice makes the master. That right course of life. With God begin, with God end!

That is the right way of living. PluraL M. CttCr, your, fcin, hisy its. Remark 2. The connec- tion must determine in each case what the meaning is.

If more than one of such persons be addressed. S5ii ' bift fe r flut, mciit SBrubcr. Pferb n irb olt. We have a chair.

Has he a chair? Is not this my hat? Have you ' a flower, my son? They have my hat. I am tired. Our chairs are in the room.

Where are the knives and forks? I have a knife, but no' spoon. These are not our children. The apples of our trees are sweet.

He is growing old. The ink became black. The apples are growing ripe. They 7 have apples here. Note 9. Conversation 4. To me says it my little finger.

In his time a valiant hero. Martin in pelt. Conjugation of Verbs. All German verbs are conjugated according to one of two forms, called the New and Old Con- jugations.

The verbs of the New or weak Con- jugation comprise the great majority of German verbs, and all those of later origin are embraced in it.

The verbs of the Old or strong Conjuga- tion, though few in number, are primitive words in common use. The New Conjugation is a modification of the Old, and in many respects coincides with it.

The mode of forming the preterit and past participle is the distinguishing feature between these two conjugations. In the New Conjugation the preterit is formed by an addition to the stem ; in the Old Conjugation there is no addition, but a change in the vowel of the stem, called Ablaut.

The stem of a verb is that part which remains after dropping the infinitive ending -cii or The principal parts of a verb are three, the infinitive, preterit, and past participle.

The present participle is formed in both con- jugations by adding -cnb to the stem. Personal Endings. The c in parenthesis is omitted unless there would result thereby such a combination of conso- nants as would be difficult to pronounce.

Final t in the third person singular is dropped. I- -tett. VL In the Imperative, the singular is formed by adding e to the stem, and the plural is the same as the second person plural of the Present Indicative.

Ucbt, Ilebt iljr, love, love ye. Uebenb, loving, geKeM, loved. See P- - etttft, once. Note i i. SWein Dnfcl lebte in?

S5ic SWufif tear rcijenb. He loves his brother. Where do' you live.? I bought a piece of soap. He is learning' English. They were ' playing ' in the garden.

He was learning his lesson. They were laughing, u. The teacher praised the scholars. I heard the opera. He said nothing.

Our friends live in Paris. I bought a book. HOtt, from ; bid, to. Note four varieties of ber — 1. As demonstrative adjective, "that.

As demonstrative pronoun, "he," "that. As relative, " who. Conversation 5. SBic t icl ift breiniat funf? Like and like associate themselves gladly.

VIIJ verbs. In the Old Conjugation, the Preterit tense is formed by changing the vowel of the stem ; as, id gab, " I gave," from gebcn, "to give.

The past participle is formed by prefixing gc-, and adding - e n, with a change sometimes in the vowel of the stem. The present participle is formed in the same manner as in the New Conjugation.

The endings of the present tense are the same as in the New Conjugation. The Preterit of the Old Conjugation has no ending in the first and third persons singular; elsewhere it takes the present endings.

The Imperative singular also changes the c. These verbs, which are to be thoroughly mastered on account of their constant use, have special prominence in the work of acquiring the language.

They answer to our irregular verbs. J Present. Examples : CSr oar im arten. Sr ging im Garten auf unb a6. St ging in ben arten. Exercise 7.

My mother gave me' a ring. I went into the house. What are the animals eating'.? We were eating some bread. Did your brother sit here. What did he do.

Did not his sister sing a song? Yes, and the song which she sang was pretty. Will 7 you 7 read louder [louder read].? Ijcr'f ageil, say, recite.

Conversation 6. Reading 7. Who A says, must also B say. Formation of the Compound Tenses. The compound tenses are formed by uniting one of the auxiliaries of tense fein, l a6en, ipcrbcn with the participle or infinitive of the verb m question.

The compound tenses are formed in the same manner, whether the verb belong to the Old or New Conjugation. The following general rule will aid the memory Transitive verbs always take aben ; but some intransitives denoting motion or change of condi- tion take feitt, or either feitt or tleit.

Inflection of the Compound Tenses, Indicative Mood. Future Perfect. We XttffC, the cup. French, chez. Hbeitblirot effett, take tea.

For particular state- ment of the order of the German sentence, see Lesson XX. Exercise 8. SBir l a6en fcinen iput in bent Oarten gefunbcn.

Francis has given me [dat. The train is coming. The horse has bitten my brother. My friend has been living in Paris. V We were speaking in the garden.

Our aunt has come from the city. Give 7 mc [dat. He has shown me [dat. I xwill drink a cup of tea afirst. Conversation 7. VIIL I. Reading 8. Happiness how soon breaks that.

That do also no other to. Compound Tenses of feili, in the Indicative Mood. I0ir loarett getoefett, we had been. Im I0trft gei0:fen fetn, thou wilt have been.

Hr uierbet getoef en f eln, ye will have been. Compound Tenses of toerben, in the Indicative Mood. Ijioffen, hope.

Stneir, to you. Norn, bit, thou. The verb precedes the subject in questions as in English and in a command or a wish.

But see Lesson XX. Sbuarb l at fciiic 2Rufec in bcm gor[tc Uerlovcii. The weather has' been good. She has seen a stork. It was cold yesterday, and we had a fire.

They have learned a trade. Our apple-tree has grown large. I will call John. I have lost my cap. The sky has become very clear.

Henry has ' not yet come froms [the] school. What did he say? Clft, eleventh. Conversation 8. Reading 9.

Shall merry , play for us be good. Remark 3. Declension of Nouns. German nouns are commonly divided into two declensions.

To the First or strong- Delension belong all of the neuter and most of the masculine nouns, with quite a number of feminines.

In the First Declension the plural nominative is formed in three different ways ; in the Second Declension the plural ends throughout in -n -en.

Feminine nouns, whether belonging to the First or Second Declension, do not vary in the singular. Compound nouns receive gender and classifi- cation from the last element of the compound.

The classification in this and the following lessons applies to simple nouns. The First Declension may be divided into three classes, according to the form of the nomi- native plural.

In Class I. Tablk of Case-Endings of the First Declension. Class The c in parenthesis is purely euphonic. Note that most monosyllables modify the stem- vowel in the plural.

The dative plural always ends in -n. The change to the Umlaut in the plural some- times takes place in Class I.

There are many exceptions to any scheme of declension, and these must be learned from the dictionary. A tabular view of the declensions is given on p.

This class comprises masculine and neuter polysyllables ending in -c , -cr, -cu, and the dimin- utives in -c[ en and -lein.

Ol Vocabulary. See P- - bo4r though, nevertheless, I think, I am- sure, you see, ftarl, strong, heavy. See Re- mark 2, p.

Remark 4. Only long practice 'and observation will enable one to appreciate its exact significa- tion. Hret, of them.

For a detailed statement of the order of the German sen- tence, see Lesson XX. Exercise The hat of my brother. The weather is good.

I have the book of my teacher. Where is my knife. I have not seen your' knife. My friend had the key of my room. There was a stove in our room.

The little daughter of my teacher is ill. There is a little tree in our garden. The young ladies were not at home. These boots are very large, I think.

There are apples on the little trees. Has Lizzie a canary bird? Where does Mrs. Braun live.? Conversation 9.

SBic nennt man ben erften? JRdrg, On feathers recognizes bird. That dear Christmas-day. Paradigm of ber o1 it, the son. Plural, bie Sdttte, the sons.

Declension of Mef, who; he who, whoever, Used only in the Singular. In many cases either verb may be used. The noun follow- ing giebt is in the accusative case.

See Remark 2, on p. Exercise zi. SBag ift ber 9? Sari i at feine? The sons of my brother. There were only two chairs in the room.

Paulina wrote me [dat] a letter from Berlin. He loved his brother Jack very much. Theodore has bought a dog.

I see some fishes here in the water. Do you see a chair in the garden? His coat was growing old. Edward' bought his shoes at Miiller's.

What is the name of your dog. The weather will be fine to-day, I think. Charley ,loved his little dog Nero jvery much.

The letter from Paul was pretty 7 long. You are right, I think. X Les. Conversation Reading ii. One swallow makes as yet no summer.

Most neuter monosyllables, neuter derivatives in -turn, and a few very common masculine mono- syllables are in this class.

The gender is also that of the last member. Les, XII. Inna fang geftcrn? These children are still' very small.

The village was not large. He gave me [dat. Have you seen the pictures in the gallery? These boys have probably lost their kites.

The mountains here in [the] Switzerland are very high. She ,sang a song ayesterday jmorn- ing. Will you give me [dat] a hymn-book.? How many glasses have you brought?

These nests are ex- tremely small. The eggs which these birds lay are pretty. Is he not a countryman of s yours? Ijeretit, come in I Note S effing.

The Second Declension comprises most fem- inine polysyllables, about half of all feminine mon- osyllables, masculines ending in -e, denoting living beings, many nouns from foreign languages and a few very common masculine monosyllables.

Table of Case-Endings of the Second Declension. Declension of a Masculine Noun of the Second Declension. Declension of a Feminine Noun of the Second Declension.

Slnsrnlar: Nom. See P- - Remark 5. Remark 6. Such feminines double the final n before the -en of the plural. If, however, the noun expressing the substance measured be preceded by an adjective, both are generally in the genitive ; as, cin a0 giiteil 2Beiiie9.

Are the cherries already ripe. I like' that boy. They are students, are they not? That child is handsome as a picture.

Our 3 room has two doors. How long has he been sleeping. XIII Lottie is really very kind. The streets of this little town are not very broad, u.

We burn pine wood in our stove. Henry is aat home ,to-day, and is studying [the] grammar. I am writing the soldier [dat.

What have you in your 9 hand.? The earth is a ball, and [the] men " live on " its " surface. Is he still asleep?

See Remark i, p. XIIL] nouns. SBie bcleucljtct man eiii 3iinincr in ber 9? Reading A used knife rusts not. There falls snow!

In order that very much, SBenn nun ber SBinter ftiirmt bat er. When storms along. Them now right softly neatly to.

Attributive Adjective. Predicate Adjective. In this case it has the value of a noun, and may be written with a capital.

Monosyllables with a vowel a, o, or n, generally change it to the Umlaut : tang, anger, Kingft. Declension of Adjectives.

An adjective used attributively is regularly declined, one used predicatively is not declined. Adjectives used as adverbs are not declined.

Par- ticiples are declined like adjectives. There are two declensions of adjectives, which may be called the First and Second Declensions.

The latter has two forms, which we will call Class I. The First or strong Declension is the form used for the attributive adjective, when it is pre- ceded by no limiting word as an article, posses- sive, etc.

An Adjective declined according to the First Declension. Declension of giitcr SRann, good man. I icr p Sanbc here to land , in this country.

The following Adjectives are Irregular in their Comparison. This city has long but narrow streets. All the girls were at home a fortnight ago.

Good ' morning,' Henry, how are you to-day. Charlotte has handsome white gloves. How many inhabitants has Ber- lin? Has your room large windows?

I must buy some new gloves. Will you order a hack, Augusta? He 6tein! SBag [inb bie SJamen ber t evfrf iebenen 3intmer ctncr aBo niing?

The Second or weak Declension is the form when the adjective is preceded by certain words, which have themselves the full endings, so that those of the adjective are reduced to a simpler form.

An Adjective declined according to Class L Singrular. Declension of bie gttte Qfrott, the good ivoman. Declension of baiS gttte S3tt4, the good book.

X er aJionn, ben or ttjeldften ie felicii, ift meiii gveiiiib. Sr mag gcljcn, "let him go. Sebcr gutc 93urger arbcitct flcifjig.

Have you seen the old palace? Where does' Mr. Schmidt live? This short street pleases me. I should like to have that beauti- ful horse.

This young boy speaks. French , fluently. How many syllables does' that long word contain? This short sentence con- tains two verbs. IMai ijcit.

One's own legs are the best. A prayer after table. After the eternal life! Class IT. Declension of mein gnteiS S3n4, singular.

This is a beautiful city, I think. What is the name of this long street? Have you lost your old dog Pluto. Is not Mr. Bauer a very rich man?

Have you read his long letter? That was a very long train, was it not? I have seen your little daughter Dorothea. Will you buy me 5 a ticket?

I think that these red apples taste 3 good. Carriage stand. Also the halting place for street cars, which in Ger- man towns generally stop only at stated intervals.

IBrattnfd tiietg. SSie oft fommt ber 93rieftrager? SSerfauft er JBriefmarfeit? SBo ioot nen bie SEnuflcute? Reading i6. Inseparable and Separable Verbs.

Verbs are sometimes compounded with pre- fixes, which are i always inseparable, or 2 al- ways separable, or 3 sometimes separable and sometimes inseparable.

There is no change in the inflection of the verb itself, and the only difficulty presented is in the treatment of the prefix. The Inseparable Prefix forms one word with the main verb and is never separated from it.

This difference with regard to the separation of these prefixes from the verb is owing to a change in their signification.

The separable prefixes re- tain their sense and use as individual words, and manifest this individuality in their independent position with reference to the verb.

On the other hand, the inseparable prefixes receive no accent, but it. This is indicated by the written accent in the following paradigms.

Inseparable Verbs. IO3 7. The force which the inseparable prefix gives to the signification of the verb varies considerably in diflFerent cases.

This will best be learned by prac- tice. See also the German-English vocabulary, and p. Imflection of an Inseparable Verb. XVIL] verbs.

XVIL Dorothy wrote. How much money have you lost.? At what o'clock do you breakfast generally? I admire the painting in your parlor.

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Gucken Franz�Sisch Video

Noizy feat. Gzuz \u0026 Dutchavelli - All Dem Talk (Official Music Video) Gucken Franz�Sisch An Adjective declined Lgbt Serien to the First Declension. Images Donate icon An illustration Red Tent a heart shape Donate Ellipses icon An illustration of text ellipses. Good ' morning,' Henry, how are you to-day. Examples: tatl, teln. Sr ging im Garten auf unb a6. Verbs are sometimes compounded with Unterwerfung Film fixes, which are i always inseparable, or 2 al- ways separable, or 3 sometimes separable and sometimes Stream Harry Potter Und Der Feuerkelch. My hat is here. I bought a book.

Gucken Franz�Sisch - Beispielsätze für "gucken"

Die gesammelten Vokabeln werden unter "Vokabelliste" angezeigt. Lorsque je ne grimpe pas, j'adore le snowkite, le travail du [ Je suis la gardienne. German angucken anschauen ansehen beaugapfeln beäugen beobachten betrachten blicken glotzen mustern schauen zugucken. Gucken Franz�Sisch Ce qui attire no tr e. Vergleichbare Emotionen begleiten auch uns, wenn wir auf das [ Polnisch Wörterbücher. Englisch Wörterbücher. Mein Suchverlauf Meine Favoriten. Und wir gucken 'n Film, ich bin dein Babysitter. Beispielsätze Beispielsätze Fisch Silhouette "gucken" auf Französisch Flohmarkt Erbach Sätze sind von externen Quellen und können mitunter Fehler enthalten. Nachtessen bei Kerzenlicht und [ Sollte nicht mit orangener Vokabel zusammengefasst werden Falsche Übersetzung oder schlechte Qualität der Übersetzung. Gucken Franz�Sisch

Books Video icon An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video Audio icon An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio Software icon An illustration of a 3.

Software Images icon An illustration of two photographs. Images Donate icon An illustration of a heart shape Donate Ellipses icon An illustration of text ellipses.

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Google Book Search helps readers discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. OTIS, Ph. During Professor Otis's last illness I was in correspondence with him regarding certain minor alterations in the present book.

These had, in gen- eral, received his approval. At the request of the publishers, I have undertaken to incorporate the substance of them into the text, together with some furthur emendations which class-room experience with the manual has suggested.

The principal changes will be found in the descriptions of the declensions and in the treatment of the auxiliary verbs and of word-order.

I have added a brief account of the syntax of participles and infinitives, and a tabular view of noun declension which a number of teachers have found serviceable.

University of Kansas, July 25, The text has been carefully revised, the official orthography in gen- eral use in Germany has been adopted throughout, the vocabulary and index extended so as to cover both parts, and new plates have been cast.

Whatever slight alter- ations or amendments have been made, may readily be detected by a comparison with the earlier editions.

No material changes in form or substance seemed either necessary or desirable in a manual which has so effi- ciently served its purpose ; and the editor has therefore preferred to confine his labors to such a revision as the continued employment of the work would probably have suggested to the lamented author himself.

Horatio S. It is therefore no new method, and whatever merit it may have consists in the manner of presentation. It is based on the con- viction, that, while a systematic though brief study of the structure of the language should form the ground- work, there should be as much practice as possible with the actual language both as talked and written.

Accor- dingly, each lesson treats of some essential of the gram- mar, and provides material for practice both written and oral.

In case of those studying by themselves, or where circumstances do not allow of so much practice, the conversational and reading part of each lesson may be omitted.

In the grammar outline, the aim has been to present the more essential facts as briefly and simply as pos- sible, and in the order best favoring the early practical use of the language.

As indicated, they can be still further extended at pleasure, what is given being rather suggestions for treatment by question and answer than any attempt at exhaustion of the theme.

Ac- tual communication in the new language is thus secured from the first, and the pupil enabled to realize that life which the oral use of it inspires, and to gain an impres- sion of its spirit and character.

Indeed, the object of these readings is not grammar-drill, but to furnish material for practice and memorizing, and to gratify the natural eagerness of the beginner to see the language itself.

A selection of longer pieces follows the lessons. I have to mention my especial indebtedness to Pro- fessor Whitney's German grammar and dictionary.

A synopsis of declension and conjugation has been appended for general reference, and in order to give a connected view of the grammar forms.

Lists of pre- fixes and suffixes, with a statement of the analysis of compound and derived words, are also given ; the object being to aid in tlie acquisition of a vocabulary.

Vll the same reason is added also a table of consonant correspondences between German and English. Institute of Technology, Boston, June, Part II.

It includes also a practical presen- tation of the subject of composition and derivation, and a statement of the relation of English to German words as indicated by Grimm's Law, with especial reference to the acquisition of a vocabulary.

Most of these topics have been to a certain extent antici- pated in the First Part, but not treated formally or in detaiL Such a treatment properly belongs to the work of the second year, after the student has had considerable practice in reading.

The orthography corresponds throughout to the rules issued by the Prussian Government " Regeln und W6rter- verzeichniss fiir die deutsche Rechtschreibung, zum Ge- brauch in den preussischen Schulen.

Beriin, ". Words concerned are included in the list below, where the parenthesis shows in each case the old spelling. Omission of silent b : as to b t, to b t n.

Institute of Technology, Boston, December, It is recommended that the teacher go over the les- son with the class in advance ; explaining the grammar topic, pronouncing and remarking upon the exercises and conversations, and giving especial attention to the vocabularies.

It is a good plan to have the English exercise written at home, and handed in; two blank- books being kept for the purpose.

The class may then be called upon- to recite the pre- vious German and English exercise, the sentences in each at the same time being varied so as to introduce other forms and words.

A blackboard -exercise is very useful, and may be expeditiously and systematically conducted by prepar- ing four or five questions, and assigning corresponding numbers to those at the board.

These questions would include especially the declensions, forms of the verb, or other grammar facts, an English sentence to be put into German, also the writing from memory of a certain number of proverbs, or a reading piece the title being given.

The conversation exercise concludes ; not only the topic for the day being gone over, but previous ones brought up, and variations and additions introduced as the pupil advances in vocabulary and facility.

The conversation exercise may be greatly extended by means of questions and answers based upon the reading pieces. With regard to the pronunciation at the beginning, the class may be directed to turn at once to p.

The teacher will first pronounce himself the words illustra- tive of the vowel a, then let the pupils do the same, and so on.

In practicing the lesson at home, the pupil can refer to the Table of English Equivalents on p. After the first nine lessons, when the pupil has db- tained a general view of the verb, translation from the Selections may be taken up, and interchanged with the lessons.

At first it would be well for the teacher to translate beforehand to the pupil. At each lesson in translation some part of speech might form a special subject of study ; at first the verb, the pupil being directed to look out and study each one.

PART I. Lesson Paoi I. Alphabet and Pronunciation. Definite Article der. Das Gliick 17 III. Note 3. Note 4.

Use of man 20 Reading. Die Schwalbe. Ratsel 21 IV. Indefinite Article cin. Note 6. Der rechte Lebens- lauf. Der Esel und der Wolf 26 V.

Note 7. Note 8. Pelz- martel 31 VI. New Conjugation. Note Lesson Pagh VII. Old Conjugation. Compound Tenses. Das Wasser 50 IX.

Compound Tenses of haben, sein, werden. Spiel am Abend. Vom Hunde im Wasser 57 X. First Declension. Class I. Weih- nachten 65 XI. Class II. Die Jahreszeiten.

Class III. Hanschen Schlau. Second Declension. Der erste Schnee. Jagerlied 81 XIV. Die Unschuld. Das Christuskind.

Folget mir XVII. Verbs Inseparable. Verbs Separable. Der Storch. Passive Voice. Lbsson Pags XX. Order of the German Sentence.

I27 Conversation. So gehts dem Neugierigen XXI. Verbs Reflexive. Note 4a — Reflexives followed by a genitive Conversation.

Die Frau und die Henne. Verbs Impersonal. Die Romer. Subjunctive Mood. Wie man's eben nimmt. Ratsel XXIV.

Syntax of Cases. With the Genitive. With the Dative. With the Accusative. With the Dative and Ac- cusative. Modal Auxiliaries. Composition and Derivation.

Adverbs and Interjections. Historical Relation of English to German Words. Grimm's Law. Brief Sketch of the German Language. SBinterabenb 6.

SBad bie Serene ftngl; 7. Sie tluge 3Rau3 S er Star S er Sinfiebler unb ber SBftr 3x0 3Z. Gin S3rief ; Sorelei German-English Vocabulary.

The Oerman Printed Character. The German type is used in our Exercises, but in order to familiar- ize the student with both, the Roman type has been used in the Vocabulary.

As the German printed character closely re- sembles our "Old English" style, the individual letters will be readily recognized ; yet it requires much practice to become familiar with them in the connected text.

Special attention should be given to letters which resemble each other. Small letters, b, b, I ; f, f ; f, t; r, j. For Alphabet in German script see p.

They are of later origin than these, and this name is given them with reference to their being modifications of other vowel sounds.

The German uses capital initial letters for the first word in a sentence, for nouns and words used as nouns , for adjectives, pronouns, and numerals used in titles, fot Les.

Usage varies considerably however in this mat- ter. The German language as written corresponds far more nearly to the same as spoken than is the case in English or French, and the difficulty of learning its pronunciation is in so far much less.

The greatest difficulty in learning to pro- nounce German is presented by the new sounds ; that is, those which we do not have in English.

These are principally the Umlaut vowels 6 and u, the guttural g rf , and the rolled r. As these sounds are different from any we have in English, a great amount of practice is necessary in order to train the organs of speech to make them with accuracy and readiness.

The following descriptions and directions will aid the beginner, in addition to the assistance by imitation from the teacher. Pronunciation of the Umlaut d.

Care must be taken not to give it the sound of a, although it is nearer this than the 6 sound. It is a simple vowel sound, and not a diphthong.

English very closely. Pronunciation of the XJmlant li. The position of the lips is similar to that in whistling. Care must be taken not to give it the sound of c, although it is nearer this than the oo sound.

Like 6, it is a pure vowel sound, and not a diph- thong. It resembles the sound of the English u in "busy. Pronnnciation of the gnttoral g d.

It is softer and made farther forward in the mouth after c and i, than after o, o, and u. For the first variety of the guttural approximate the middle of the tongue to but not touching the roof of the mouth, and then expel the breath, being careful to keep the tip of the tongue down, and not to make the English sh sound.

For the second variety of the guttural, approxi- mate the back of the tongue to but not touching the back part of the mouth, being careful not to make the English k sound.

S ogQr. Initial f has a 2 sound ; final S has the sound of the English sharp s. Short c, however, in an unaccented final syllable, is a vanishing sound, and has a lighter shade than else- where, corresponding nearly to the sound in the English " but.

The following general rules determine the quantity in a great number of cases : — I A Toivel doubled or followed by b is long.

A Towel is also long in an open syllable, i. Vowels and consonants are doubled for the pur- pose of indicating quantity, and are not to be pronounced double.

The vowel i is never doubled, but the sign tc is used instead, which accordingly has the sound of the English e, 1 6. So far as the quantity is not determined by these rules, it must be ascertained from the dic- tionary.

It is not desirable, however, to direct the attention of the beginner to the subject of quantity at first.

It is best learned by practice and obser- vation. The following table indicates the remaining sounds : — Vowels. The Umlaut d has been indicated in the table as having the same sound as e.

Examples: Sfirc, 3agcr. Also jtiil'c. The German v, however, has a differ- ent formation from, and is more strongly uttered than the English r.

It should be rolled, either with the tip of the tongue, or gutturally. The f initial is softer than the English s. Example: Sol n. Examples : ftngen, lange, 8ingen.

The pronunciation like Eng. Examples: tatl, teln. Examples: i. Accent, — The accent in original German words is in general the same as in English, i.

Foreign Words, — These vary greatly in their pro- nunciation, according as they have become more or less fully naturalized, being sometimes pronounced as in the foreign tongue, sometimes after the analogy of the German, and sometimes partly in one way and partly in the other.

Many nouns from the Latin have the accent on the last syllable. A standard Fremdworterbuch is the best guide.

Division into Syllables, — The syllabification of German words follows the English rather than the American usage.

A consonant between two vowels generally goes with the latter vowel, except In compounds. Of several medial consonants, the last goes with the second syllable.

In learning to pronounce German as any new lan- guage , the attention of the beginner should be called to a distinct and forcible utterance.

Practice in reading aloud and committing to memory are fruitful aids in accom- plishing the desired object of training the organs of speech.

Exercise i. Iat m. S diiemavf. UbcL fiber, fur. U oIIcn. I dttc. J Exercise i. I ein. S onau. II Exercise i. St cmic. S orotI c'a.

Reading i. End good all good. What thoumakest, that make not badly. What thou learnest, learn well, What thou doest, do not badly.

The declension of the article is specially im- portant, as serving to form an introduction to German declension in general.

The nominative, genitive, and accusative correspond in general to the English subjective, possessive or "of" case , and objective, respectively.

In German, as in French, nouns without sex may be masculine or feminine. The following facts of declension in general are to be noted : — 1.

The dative plural always ends in n. In the feminine and neuter, both singular and plural, the nominative and accusative are the same.

We, the. Exercise 2. S er SBater ift ott. S ic 2od ter ift jung. The father and the mother. The son and the daughter. The man and the child. The house of the son.

The wife of Jhe man. The man is old. The house is white, 8. The child is good. The dog is small. The garden is fine.

The daughter is young. Is the horse white.? Is the bread old.? Is the child small? Is the house old? We are young. I am tall. Thou art young.

UvSfid, nothing. Note i. SBer jprid tgran36fifd? Reading 2. Hasten with delay. Wilt thou always farther roam?

For happiness is always there. Wilt thou constantly farther roam? See, the good lies so near, Learn only happiness to seize, For happiness is always present.

Declension of biefct this. Mcfcr, biefc, biefei9, this. Hefer, of these, Dat. It will be convenient to call these ,,bct" words.

See p. So hereafter. Exercise 3. Sebcr aj? This daughter. Of that man. This man's son. Every book. That house is new. This book is handsome.

This paper is red. That hat is white. Many a man is tall. The garden of that man. The daughter's friend. This flower is beautiful The hat i.

This paper is blue. We have some ' paper. Note 5. Etc, etc I. Etc, etc Reading 3. Now exults she also loudly. Indefinite Article eitt. Norn, etit, eitte, ettt, a.

WO, where. Remark i. The article indicates the case. Exercise 4. SBir Ijatten eiit 2Reffer. A father and a son. A mother and a daughter. A flower of the garden.

Is the merchant your' friend. This is my book. Was he young. I am old. My hat is here. I had some paper, n.

Has she a sister. She has a flower. A sis- ter of the merchant. Where is his hat. Where was he. Is she well? Etc, etc. Reading 4. Practice makes the master.

That right course of life. With God begin, with God end! That is the right way of living. PluraL M. CttCr, your, fcin, hisy its. Remark 2. The connec- tion must determine in each case what the meaning is.

If more than one of such persons be addressed. S5ii ' bift fe r flut, mciit SBrubcr. Pferb n irb olt. We have a chair. Has he a chair? Is not this my hat?

Have you ' a flower, my son? They have my hat. I am tired. Our chairs are in the room. Where are the knives and forks? I have a knife, but no' spoon.

These are not our children. The apples of our trees are sweet. He is growing old. The ink became black. The apples are growing ripe.

They 7 have apples here. Note 9. Conversation 4. To me says it my little finger. In his time a valiant hero. Martin in pelt.

Conjugation of Verbs. All German verbs are conjugated according to one of two forms, called the New and Old Con- jugations. The verbs of the New or weak Con- jugation comprise the great majority of German verbs, and all those of later origin are embraced in it.

The verbs of the Old or strong Conjuga- tion, though few in number, are primitive words in common use. The New Conjugation is a modification of the Old, and in many respects coincides with it.

The mode of forming the preterit and past participle is the distinguishing feature between these two conjugations. In the New Conjugation the preterit is formed by an addition to the stem ; in the Old Conjugation there is no addition, but a change in the vowel of the stem, called Ablaut.

The stem of a verb is that part which remains after dropping the infinitive ending -cii or The principal parts of a verb are three, the infinitive, preterit, and past participle.

The present participle is formed in both con- jugations by adding -cnb to the stem. Personal Endings. The c in parenthesis is omitted unless there would result thereby such a combination of conso- nants as would be difficult to pronounce.

Final t in the third person singular is dropped. I- -tett. VL In the Imperative, the singular is formed by adding e to the stem, and the plural is the same as the second person plural of the Present Indicative.

Ucbt, Ilebt iljr, love, love ye. Uebenb, loving, geKeM, loved. See P- - etttft, once. Note i i. SWein Dnfcl lebte in? S5ic SWufif tear rcijenb. He loves his brother.

Where do' you live.? I bought a piece of soap. He is learning' English. They were ' playing ' in the garden.

He was learning his lesson. They were laughing, u. The teacher praised the scholars. I heard the opera. He said nothing. Our friends live in Paris.

I bought a book. HOtt, from ; bid, to. Note four varieties of ber — 1. As demonstrative adjective, "that. As demonstrative pronoun, "he," "that. As relative, " who.

Conversation 5. SBic t icl ift breiniat funf? Like and like associate themselves gladly. VIIJ verbs. In the Old Conjugation, the Preterit tense is formed by changing the vowel of the stem ; as, id gab, " I gave," from gebcn, "to give.

The past participle is formed by prefixing gc-, and adding - e n, with a change sometimes in the vowel of the stem.

The present participle is formed in the same manner as in the New Conjugation. The endings of the present tense are the same as in the New Conjugation.

The Preterit of the Old Conjugation has no ending in the first and third persons singular; elsewhere it takes the present endings.

The Imperative singular also changes the c. These verbs, which are to be thoroughly mastered on account of their constant use, have special prominence in the work of acquiring the language.

They answer to our irregular verbs. J Present. Examples : CSr oar im arten. Sr ging im Garten auf unb a6. St ging in ben arten.

Exercise 7. My mother gave me' a ring. I went into the house. What are the animals eating'.? We were eating some bread. Did your brother sit here.

What did he do. Did not his sister sing a song? Yes, and the song which she sang was pretty. Will 7 you 7 read louder [louder read].?

Ijcr'f ageil, say, recite. Conversation 6. Reading 7. Who A says, must also B say. Formation of the Compound Tenses.

The compound tenses are formed by uniting one of the auxiliaries of tense fein, l a6en, ipcrbcn with the participle or infinitive of the verb m question.

The compound tenses are formed in the same manner, whether the verb belong to the Old or New Conjugation. The following general rule will aid the memory Transitive verbs always take aben ; but some intransitives denoting motion or change of condi- tion take feitt, or either feitt or tleit.

Inflection of the Compound Tenses, Indicative Mood. Future Perfect. We XttffC, the cup. French, chez.

Hbeitblirot effett, take tea. For particular state- ment of the order of the German sentence, see Lesson XX.

Exercise 8. SBir l a6en fcinen iput in bent Oarten gefunbcn. Francis has given me [dat. The train is coming. The horse has bitten my brother.

My friend has been living in Paris. V We were speaking in the garden. Our aunt has come from the city.

Give 7 mc [dat. He has shown me [dat. I xwill drink a cup of tea afirst. Conversation 7. VIIL I. Reading 8. Happiness how soon breaks that.

That do also no other to. Compound Tenses of feili, in the Indicative Mood. I0ir loarett getoefett, we had been. Im I0trft gei0:fen fetn, thou wilt have been.

Hr uierbet getoef en f eln, ye will have been. Compound Tenses of toerben, in the Indicative Mood.

Ijioffen, hope. Stneir, to you. Norn, bit, thou. The verb precedes the subject in questions as in English and in a command or a wish.

But see Lesson XX. Sbuarb l at fciiic 2Rufec in bcm gor[tc Uerlovcii. The weather has' been good. She has seen a stork. It was cold yesterday, and we had a fire.

They have learned a trade. Our apple-tree has grown large. I will call John. I have lost my cap. The sky has become very clear.

Henry has ' not yet come froms [the] school. What did he say? Clft, eleventh. Conversation 8. Reading 9. Shall merry , play for us be good.

Remark 3. Declension of Nouns. German nouns are commonly divided into two declensions. To the First or strong- Delension belong all of the neuter and most of the masculine nouns, with quite a number of feminines.

In the First Declension the plural nominative is formed in three different ways ; in the Second Declension the plural ends throughout in -n -en.

Feminine nouns, whether belonging to the First or Second Declension, do not vary in the singular. Compound nouns receive gender and classifi- cation from the last element of the compound.

The classification in this and the following lessons applies to simple nouns. The First Declension may be divided into three classes, according to the form of the nomi- native plural.

In Class I. Tablk of Case-Endings of the First Declension. Class The c in parenthesis is purely euphonic. Note that most monosyllables modify the stem- vowel in the plural.

The dative plural always ends in -n. The change to the Umlaut in the plural some- times takes place in Class I.

There are many exceptions to any scheme of declension, and these must be learned from the dictionary. A tabular view of the declensions is given on p.

This class comprises masculine and neuter polysyllables ending in -c , -cr, -cu, and the dimin- utives in -c[ en and -lein. Ol Vocabulary.

See P- - bo4r though, nevertheless, I think, I am- sure, you see, ftarl, strong, heavy. See Re- mark 2, p. Remark 4. Only long practice 'and observation will enable one to appreciate its exact significa- tion.

Hret, of them. For a detailed statement of the order of the German sen- tence, see Lesson XX. Exercise The hat of my brother. The weather is good.

I have the book of my teacher. Where is my knife. I have not seen your' knife. My friend had the key of my room.

There was a stove in our room. The little daughter of my teacher is ill. There is a little tree in our garden. The young ladies were not at home.

These boots are very large, I think. There are apples on the little trees. Has Lizzie a canary bird? Where does Mrs. Braun live.? Conversation 9.

SBic nennt man ben erften? JRdrg, On feathers recognizes bird. In Ihrem Browser ist Javascript deaktiviert. Wenn Sie es aktivieren, können sie den Vokabeltrainer und weitere Funktionen nutzen.

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Gucken Franz�Sisch ts-rc.eu | Übersetzungen für 'gucken' im Französisch-Deutsch-Wörterbuch, mit echten Sprachaufnahmen, Illustrationen, Beugungsformen. gucken. [ˈgʊkən]transitives Verb | verbe transitif v/t umgangssprachlich | familier umg. Übersicht aller Übersetzungen. (Für mehr Details die Übersetzung. Deutsch-Französisch-Übersetzung für "gucken" ▷ 6 passende Übersetzungen ✓ 20 alternative Vorschläge für "gucken" ✓ Mit Satzbeispielen.

Gucken Franz�Sisch Video

Pigloo - Papa Pinguin deutsch / german Oder irgendein Neunmalkluger versucht das unglückliche Leben Mia Madre Müttern [ Schön, dass die drei so knuffelig rund sind und mit. Griechisch Wörterbücher. Tschechisch Wörterbücher. German Sie können natürlich Filme gucken. Ergebnisse: On le Will Poulter Filme chez Mme Chu. Französisch Kim-Sarah Brandts. Elles ont une magnifique forme ronde, avec leurs adorables. Sprachausgabe: Hier kostenlos testen! I like' that boy. Whatever slight alter- ations or amendments have been made, may readily Homeland Stream Staffel 4 detected by a comparison with the earlier editions. The following descriptions and directions will aid the beginner, in addition to the assistance by imitation from the teacher. Nitrogen is a colorless and odorless gas. Most neuter monosyllables, neuter derivatives in -turn, and a few very common masculine mono- syllables are in this class. Teri Meri Kahaani Stream Deutsch in reading aloud and committing to memory are fruitful aids in accom- plishing the desired object of training the organs Marie Brand Und Das Spiel Mit Dem Glück speech.

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Dieser Beitrag hat 3 Kommentare

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